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Aerial Helka and Taapi

Aerial shot of local Tharu women fishing in Rapti river using traditional gear called "Helka and Taapi".

Aerial shot of local Tharu women fishing in Rapti river using traditional gear called "Helka and Taapi".

Aerial shot of local Tharu women fishing in Rapti river using traditional gear called "Helka and Taapi".
Paani encourages the use of traditional gear over destructive fishing practices, and works with local communities on fish conservation to keep aquatic biodiversity intact.

Photo credit: USAID Paani Program/Aura Creations
WaterMelon

Pateshwori Chaudhary leads members of the Baikha fishing group to patrol against destructive fishing practices in the Rapti River.

Pateshwori Chaudhary leads members of the Baikha fishing group to patrol against destructive fishing practices in the Rapti River.

The Rawa community Aquatic Animal Conservation Group in Middle Rapti Watershed is growing watermelons and seasonal vegetables in river beds after receiving alternative livelihood development support from the USAID Paani Program (Paani) and Gadhawa Rural Municipality.
Providing alternative livelihood options for fisher communities is critical to maintaining fish stock and supporting fish conservation.

Photo credit: USAID Paani Program/Aura Creations
Traditional Fishing in Rakam

A local fisher woman in Rakam, Middle Karnali Watershed uses traditional methods to fish in the Karnali River.

A local fisher woman in Rakam, Middle Karnali Watershed uses traditional methods to fish in the Karnali River.

A local fisher woman in Rakam, Middle Karnali Watershed uses traditional methods to fish in the Karnali River.
The USAID Paani Program has supported this community in succesfully passing an Aquatic Animal Conservation Bill in 2018, which aims to promote sustainable fishing and curb destructive practices that threaten local aquatic bio diversity.

Photo Credit: USAID Paani Program/Aura Creations
Dhan Kumari Chaudhary and friends

Dhan Kumari Chaudhary and other women in the Rawa fishing group in Middle Rapti Watershed play a key role in the conservation of aquatic animals.

Paani and Gadhawa Rural Municipality in Dang provided the local women with support for organic agriculture and river bed farming as an alternative livelihood scheme to reduce pressure on aquatic biodiversity. Providing alternative livelihood options for fisher communities is critical to maintaining fish stock and supporting fish conservation.

Photo credit: Sudin Bajracharya for USAID
Baikha Fishing Group

Dhan Kumari serves as the leader of this group and advocates for non-destructive fishing practices. The group makes regular patrols along the river to control illegal practices.

Dhan Kumari serves as the leader of this group and advocates for non-destructive fishing practices. The group makes regular patrols along the river to control illegal practices.

Dhan Kumari Chaudhary and other women in the Rawa fishing group in Middle Rapti Watershed play a key role in the conservation of aquatic animals.
The group, formed with support from the USAID Paani Program, now understands the need for fish conservation. Dhan Kumari serves as the leader of this group and advocates for non-destructive fishing practices. The group makes regular patrols along the river to control illegal practices.

Photo credit: Sudin Bajracharya for USAID
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KARNALI BASIN CONSERVATION

Supporting the broader goals of sustainable development.

Unsustainable business models and profit maximization at the expense of natural resource depletion has presented alarming signs of environmental catastrophe globally. The need for a responsible investment practice – a longer-term financing mechanism with landscape & biodiversity conservation built into investment decisions – has never been more urgent.

Karnali River Basin Area, in the western part of Nepal, is endowed with ecological treasures. Karnali river – the longest river in the country – originates from the snow-capped Himalayas in the north and reaches the ‘flora and fauna rich’ dense forests in the south. The untapped potential of the resources, with hydro resources at the core, in a historically marginalized and poverty-stricken region presents a range of opportunities for socioeconomic development.

Wild-and-Scenic-Karnali

Photo credit: Nabin Baral for USAID

Kardung

Photo credit: Nabin Baral for USAID

Creating an environment conducive to a thriving entrepreneurship ecosystem in the region requires collaboration between a wide range of stakeholders: all levels of government, civil society, development partners, and an innovative private sector with an ability to mobilize financing and access wider markets.

Karnali River Basin Conservation Fund (KRBCF, an impact investment fund) and Karnali Basin Conservation Foundation (a non-profit distribution entity) are twin entities institutionalized by DSV Advisors with the financial support from DAI’s seed grant (through the USAID-funded ‘Paani’ Program) to drive the needed multi-stakeholder collaboration.

The Mighty KARNALI RIVER

Karnali River Basin Conservation Fund (KRBCF)

less than 2%

tourists in Nepal visit the Karnali

1 out of 5

herb processing industries are in Karnali

1000s of MW

the hydropower potential of the Karnali

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